Springtime at Hopewell House: Welcome to our New Blog

Welcome to our new blog for Hopewell House! In the months to come we hope to share news about events and happenings in our community, as well as information about mental health issues. Our new blog is part of our effort to redesign our website to truly showcase our mission and our very special residential program.

Hopewell House provides group homes for adults struggling with mental illness. Our setting in the middle of busy Fairfax County provides a tranquil background for dignity, hope, and healing. Our new blog will offer updates about events and life at Hopewell House; information and resources about mental illness; and news of interest.

What is Hopewell House?

What makes Hopewell House unique? We provide a supportive community to those who find it difficult to achieve inclusion in society because of mental illness. Our historic farm location has a rural, quiet feel, yet we and our residents are very much a part of our greater community.

Hopewell House was founded out of a place of love, as a family searched in vain for a high quality of life and a caring atmosphere for a relative diagnosed with a mental illness. Thanks to their initial efforts, Hopewell House residents have a place to live with comfort, dignity, and respect…in short, a place to call home.

Our “coaching” approach at Hopewell House is what really sets us apart, and ensures the truly supportive environment our residents deserve. Highly trained and experienced, our Behavioral Health Coaches assist, support, and monitor each person’s activities and progress with encouragement and gentle direction when needed. They help maintain a home environment as our residents strive to live independently.



A place to call home.

Spring Comes to Winfield Farm

It’s also time for us to welcome Spring to Hopewell House! This season is a time for regrowth and revitalization. That goes not only for nature, but for Hopewell House as well. Winfield Farm, the historic farm that serves as our home, is beautiful all year round but especially in the spring. After some cold springtime weather, bulbs such as tulips are in flower, and the grass is green.

Winfield Farm has undergone its own periods of regrowth and revitalization. The farm, dating back to the 1700s, was abandoned for years before it was purchased in 1925 by Dr. Buckner, who renovated the Main House. The property was again renovated in 2008 when new owners bought it; in 2009, a new barn was built to replace one lost in a fire years before.

It may no longer be a working farm, but Winfield Farm serves a lovely, peaceful setting for our group homes. Explore our historic structures, flower beds, ponds, and walks in our online photo gallery.

For many, Spring is a time for hope and healing, a very appropriate metaphor for Hopewell House and our program. We hope you visit us regularly for updates about our work at Hopewell House!



Tulips blooming at Hopewell House.






Welcome to our new blog for Hopewell House! In the months to come we hope to share news about events and happenings in our community, as well as information about mental health issues. Our new blog is part of our effort to redesign our website to truly showcase our mission and our very special residential program.

Hopewell House provides group homes for adults struggling with mental illness. Our setting in the middle of busy Fairfax County provides a tranquil background for dignity, hope, and healing. Our new blog will offer updates about events and life at Hopewell House; information and resources about mental illness; and news of interest.

What is Hopewell House?

What makes Hopewell House unique? We provide a supportive community to those who find it difficult to achieve inclusion in society because of mental illness. Our historic farm location has a rural, quiet feel, yet we and our residents are very much a part of our greater community.

Hopewell House was founded out of a place of love, as a family searched in vain for a high quality of life and a caring atmosphere for a relative diagnosed with a mental illness. Thanks to their initial efforts, Hopewell House residents have a place to live with comfort, dignity, and respect…in short, a place to call home.

Our “coaching” approach at Hopewell House is what really sets us apart, and ensures the truly supportive environment our residents deserve. Highly trained and experienced, our Behavioral Health Coaches assist, support, and monitor each person’s activities and progress with encouragement and gentle direction when needed. They help maintain a home environment as our residents strive to live independently.



A place to call home.

Spring Comes to Winfield Farm

It’s also time for us to welcome Spring to Hopewell House! This season is a time for regrowth and revitalization. That goes not only for nature, but for Hopewell House as well. Winfield Farm, the historic farm that serves as our home, is beautiful all year round but especially in the spring. After some cold springtime weather, bulbs such as tulips are in flower, and the grass is green.

Winfield Farm has undergone its own periods of regrowth and revitalization. The farm, dating back to the 1700s, was abandoned for years before it was purchased in 1925 by Dr. Buckner, who renovated the Main House. The property was again renovated in 2008 when new owners bought it; in 2009, a new barn was built to replace one lost in a fire years before.

It may no longer be a working farm, but Winfield Farm serves a lovely, peaceful setting for our group homes. Explore our historic structures, flower beds, ponds, and walks in our online photo gallery.

For many, Spring is a time for hope and healing, a very appropriate metaphor for Hopewell House and our program. We hope you visit us regularly for updates about our work at Hopewell House!



Tulips blooming at Hopewell House.






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